Backdrop rollers – saving space and my sanity!

Since gaining some studio space I decided to invest in backdrop rollers as a permanent fixture. And wow, what an amazing piece of kit!

As useful as my portable backdrop stands are the tripod legs take up too much room, can be tripped over and can only display one backdrop at a time. I bought a set of brackets which can hold three backdrops at any one time, yup three!

Once the brackets were positioned on the far wall of my studio I purchased three lengths of 2.5″ pvc piping, cut them to length and used them to connect the brackets together.

IMG_1647[1256].JPG

My backdrops are now raised and lowered by pulleys and during times when they’re not in use I store a few of backdrops on the rollers to keep them out of the way and crease free.

IMG_1652[1255].JPG

Displaying a backdrop (and putting it away) now takes seconds! Definitely one of my best buys.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

A photography studio – the perfect space

The day finally came when I realised my photographic equipment and other craft materials were taking over the house. Rather than move to a bigger house the logical solution was to stick a flag in one of the sheds and claim it as my own!

 The shed I now owned was the smaller of the two and hadn’t been used for at least half a century. I came to realise that while stripping it back to its shell. It was dark and dusty and had been insulated with old coal sacks and invoices from the 1930’s. Donning a face mask and goggles I ripped out old cupboards, pulled out rusty nails, sanded and cleaned. It looked awful but at least it was a blank canvas.

My father-in-law and husband boarded the structure with ply and I painted it in brilliant white emulsion. Even my son helped paint the floor boards. A real family affair.

13509149_1798233507072286_939480828285925672_n

Once the paint was dry I couldn’t wait to move myself in. One half of the ‘studio’ was to be dedicated to my crafts and the other to photography. I bought some storage units from Ikea and used a writing desk from one of the spare bedrooms and the layout soon began to take shape. I emptied the house of yarns, knitting needles, crochet hooks, a paper cutting machine, a sewing machine, fabrics for quilting and much more. The remaining area was set up for my photographic space. It was small but a great place to start.

My ‘studio’ has turned out to be a great place to retreat when I need some quiet time to think but the most amazing thing about having a photography ‘studio’ is being able to trial a new set and leave it as work in progress and keep revisiting it.

….and it has a key so I can lock myself in. Even better!